All Triumphs are rubbish.

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James Elliott
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I agree with Dougal on the whole. I've driven an awful lot of TR6s and the nicest by far was a totally original one on skinny tyres with no suspension upgrades. What people don't seem to realise when they spend all that time and money "improving" them is that the development team had rather more skill than most of us do, and they did the best that could be done with the components.

On the other hand, Triumph 2000s like mine are obviously best dropped a couple of inches, put on 500lb springs, upped to 2.5 with fuel injection, Stag police m/o/d box, drilled discs etc etc.

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Valve Bounce
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Having bought a lovely original 2 owner TR over 20 years ago, I’ve progressively
ruined it over the years with all sorts of uprating nonsense. I agree with
Dougal, the best fun I've had has been with uprated springs etc. but keeping
good old Michelin 165x15 XZX so you can get a good drift on. Braking in a straight
line does need a little modulation but you get used to that.

Here I am ruining a perfectly good set of Longstone's finest 185/70HR15 Avon
CR6ZZs, too wide I know, but bloody good fun.

focus magic 2

Triumphs definitely not all rubbish.

plastic penguin
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James Elliott wrote:

I agree with Dougal on the whole. I've driven an awful lot of TR6s and the nicest by far was a totally original one on skinny tyres with no suspension upgrades. What people don't seem to realise when they spend all that time and money "improving" them is that the development team had rather more skill than most of us do, and they did the best that could be done with the components.

On the other hand, Triumph 2000s like mine are obviously best dropped a couple of inches, put on 500lb springs, upped to 2.5 with fuel injection, Stag police m/o/d box, drilled discs etc etc.

Indeed: I'm a bit of a traditionalist - dislike classic cars souped up. If I want to see bodged  car (thin generalisation) I'll go to a stock car meet. Suppose I'm contrasupercilious - a definite 'stick in the mud'.

rolymo35
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 I am afraid i have to agree all Triumphs start off as rubbish and have be modified to become all time favourites . This was my face- lift TR-8 which needed serious alterations  before it became a real fun car !!

RolyMo

plastic penguin
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rolymo35 wrote:

 I am afraid i have to agree all Triumphs start off as rubbish and have be modified to become all time favourites . This was my face- lift TR-8 which needed serious alterations  before it became a real fun car !!

Mmmm, probably look good on a Californian Highway with The Beach Boys "Fun, fun, fun" spewing from the multi-track, but in the quiescent of a sleepy English village it wouldn't cut the mustard (subjectively).

BTW, looks as though you ploughed a lot of time and effort into the facelift.

PS: TR7s weren't a hit with me... nor the Toledos, later Dolomites ('HL' versions in particular), 2000... all these aforementioned models get an unambiguous :THUMBS DOWN:

DUESIE
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Can't say ALL Triumphs are rubbish. Just the BL ones from the seventies; Dolomite, Stag. TR7/8 etc. Prior to that Triumph had their own identity and probably made as many crap cars as the rest of the British undustry, no more no less. Each model was targeted at it's own market niche and they usually got it right. But you get what you pay for, so there must be a big difference between a base model Herald and a 2500PI or TR6. The later BL years were a sad decline for all models, and indeed the rest of the BL range. Some good ideas and many missed opportunities, but the fact is that Triumph descended through a sad decline and finished by making one of the most ordinary Hondas (and that's quite a claim) under licence. Now there is REAL rubbish for you. But no worse a fate than the loss of once great names like Austin, Morris, Wolseley, MG and Rover, with hindsight it would have been kinder to have killed them all off in 1972.

plastic penguin
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DUESIE wrote:

Can't say ALL Triumphs are rubbish. Just the BL ones from the seventies; Dolomite, Stag. TR7/8 etc. Prior to that Triumph had their own identity and probably made as many crap cars as the rest of the British undustry, no more no less. Each model was targeted at it's own market niche and they usually got it right. But you get what you pay for, so there must be a big difference between a base model Herald and a 2500PI or TR6. The later BL years were a sad decline for all models, and indeed the rest of the BL range. Some good ideas and many missed opportunities, but the fact is that Triumph descended through a sad decline and finished by making one of the most ordinary Hondas (and that's quite a claim) under licence. Now there is REAL rubbish for you. But no worse a fate than the loss of once great names like Austin, Morris, Wolseley, MG and Rover, with hindsight it would have been kinder to have killed them all off in 1972.

Too true: Even the lovely Joanna Lumley couldn't make the TR7 look good.

Therein lies an amusing story, and demonstrates how inept BL were: Brian Clemens the creator and writer of the New Avengers and The Professionals had awful trouble with BL. Quite often you'd see a different colour TR7 from the previous episode. On occasions you'll see a Dolly Sprint in place of the TR7. This was, according to legend, down to the fact the cars had to be returned to BL and come a new series the PR dept at BL would say: "Mr. Clemens, you can't have the blue TR7 but we can let you have a white Dolomite instead."

Sheesh, no wonder BL went pear-shaped. By the Second season of The Professionals Clemens, wisely, switched to mainly Fords. BL's downfall was self-inflicted IMHO.

Speedangel
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I agree with Plastic Penguin (Love your username by the way). I love Triumph and believe me, I used to take real care of it when I owned my TR6!

They are great cars and in my opinion, undervalued. Parts are quite easy to find and low running costs. It's funny coincidence I came accross this discussion board, I was talking to a colleague yesterday and we were in fact discussing what Triumph I should buy next! lol

plastic penguin
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Speedangel wrote:

I agree with Plastic Penguin (Love your username by the way). I love Triumph and believe me, I used to take real care of it when I owned my TR6!

They are great cars and in my opinion, undervalued. Parts are quite easy to find and low running costs. It's funny coincidence I came accross this discussion board, I was talking to a colleague yesterday and we were in fact discussing what Triumph I should buy next! lol

...and have you made a short-list?

Thanks BTW...Ah, that damn 'username' has been haunting me since (circa) 1977. It used to be my CB 'Handle'.

DUESIE
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Thinking about the Triumph story made me realise how quickly the British car industry changed from a wide range of top brand names with exciting new models and cause for optimism in the sixties, to crap cars and subsequent loss of many proud names in the seventies. For example, someone at Triumph must have had balls to give the go-ahead to the idea of putting a hot six in a Herald and calling it Vitesse. And thanks to whoever did, because that kind of thing would not happen today. Then we had the seventies and the Stag. Michelotti made a good stab at designing the shape, let down only by few details, but why BL did not take the obvious route and use the proven Rover/Buick V8 instead of a fragile untried engine with no future, could only have been down to petty internal politics. Hindsight is easy I know, but if BL had left Rover as the manufacturer of the big luxury saloon and Triumph as the sportier brand there would have been room for parts sharing with the cost saving that implies, and still have preserved both names. By the mid-seventies we had the Triumph 2500PI as a direct rival to the Rover P6 and by then it was only the police who were buying either. The rest of the Triumph porridge range by then, 1300, 1500, Dolomite, were all too similar to justify and with the Spitfire and TR6 (both throwbacks to the old days of real wind-in-the-hair sports cars) pensioned off there was probably only small change left to come up with anything new. TR7/8? No thanks. A cleaned up Mk2 Stag with a proper V8? Didn't happen. Triumph Acclaim? Don't bother.