Barn finds

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GBt
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This barn find 66 Q series 428 FE Big Block "Thunderjet" powered Ford Hard Top did in fact get restored

Nuno Granja
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GBt,

the motorbike on the right is some recente japanese trail and on the left is a EFS GT SUPER

 

Off Topic;

EFS is one of the numerous portuguese 50cc brands who grows under the 2 whells market protection laws before the 1974 revolution, taxing big cube capacity and keep japs away wilth high import taxes.

We have a lot of brands, and with the "CASAL" exception, most of them just put together 50cc bikes with engines and more or less parts from other manufactures. Only Casal, an old Zundapp importer, build his own engines, but most of them are copy of Zundapp 50cc engines (pistons ciliinders, clutchs, etc, etc, are interchangeable) or MotoVillla in 125cc. In the end (80's) Casal projected and build is own engine for the top of the 50cc range, know as the "Casal of six", first portuguese 50cc bike with six speeds and disk brake at the front. They even get a world class record of speed with HUVO tunned engine, but is to late, years and years of underveloped products with a lot of genetic problems and pour build quality, could not compete in a open market. I think the same thing appens to spanish motorcicle  industry and in another scale  to part of the british sportscar and most of british bike industries.

As example of this the career of one of the best hits in portuguese sport 50cc bikes, the "SIS Sachs V5" (V5 is for 5 speed gerabox, a must at that time)..

Introduced in the early 60's, is a very good sport 50cc bike from that time, but end his carear like that in the early 90's...

Basically wit the same engine, carburator, exaust, electrical sistem and frame. (they just screw two bars in the front but the main structure is the same.)

 

EFS for example, sells the GT (working class workhorse model) and the Formula 1 (sport model with a fuel tank copied from suzuki) with exactly the same running gear

 

The biggest market players are Casal (with own engines), Famel (only with Zundapp enginess) SIS Sachs (only with Sachs engines), EFS and  MacalL (These two use Sachs, Casal, Zundapp, Kreidler, Puch,  Morini, or even Honda  engines. But there are a  plethora of other small brands, and with more or less dregree of in house production, they mix parts from the same supliers. For sucessive generations thoose 50cc's are objects of deisre, today this kind of portuguse/only bikes (we call the "motorizadas") have a strong follow . Tthe preservation ratio is growing, clubs, events and a network of supliers and specialist is start to show up. 

More at...

http://www.motorizadas50.pt.vu/

sorry by the extense off topic and my bad english.

 

nuno granja

Chris Martin
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GBt wrote:

This barn find 66 Q series 428 FE Big Block "Thunderjet" powered Ford Hard Top did in fact get restored

Now you're talking! My old '66 was a 390 but a friend had a white '66 Landau with  a 428, (photos another time). The Hardtop was the better car if only because it does not have such a big blind spot over the shoulder. Driving a LHD Landau in UK did make some turns and manouvres difficult. The big 'birds are now well served by a parts and restoration industry in the USA just like the Mustangs and Tri-Chevs so yes a reasonably complete one like that would certainly be restorable.

Chris M.

 

Chris Martin
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Nuno, interesting stuff about the history of Portugese 'bikes. I never knew there was such an industry, although I remember there being plenty running around I just assumed they were all imports.

I do remember the Portaro however, back in the seventies and eighties there were many about. I took a liking to them at the time, but wonder if many of those survive? I do not remember ever seeing one outside of Portugal although I believe they were based on the Romanian ARO and there was a van too, the Tagus I think?

Chris M.

 

Nuno Granja
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Chris Martin,

The Portaro, yes is baseed on Romanian ARO but with a japanese engine and is starting to have a follow here, leaving the shadow the UMM, the most successfull portuguese FWD off road vehicle., this time based on the french Cournil. The Portaro is produced in lower numbers, so only a few survive.

One well know member of the bigest portuguese classic forum , Miguel Martins, have one in a very good original condition (a rare small truck version "the Campina") and is some kind of embassador of that lost brand.

He show it at national TV last year, on a temporary exposition on the Nacional Car Museum of Caramulo and have a blog...

http://portaro320campina.blogspot.com/

You can find all about portuguese made cars, motos, bus, bycicles and trains at:

http://rodasdeviriato.blogspot.com/

(sorry  both are in portuguese only)

 

To compensate alt this off-topics, get back on-topic, with some cars find  all abandoned or stored..

First a Portaro abandoned somehere in Portugal...

Another abandoned on the roadside, a late series with black front grille (first séries have a metal one like Miguel's Campina) and more glass in the rear ...

 

 

And fake badge as never had a V6 version..

 

 

Next finds in Central America, Costa Rica, few years ago. An UMM  the other portuguese off road vehicle, a  last series with plastic body parts, abandoned far away from home...

 

A local build Land Rover...

 

Another FWD vehicle, but I'm not sure  about what is it...

A fintail Mercedes...

 

A late 60's VW Bus...

And a costumised VW Type 181 "Thing", 

 

 

nuno g

 

 

 

GBt
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66, as restored

My apologies Petrol Head, I was forgetting my manners, thanks for the thanks and you are very welcome,as always.

Nuno, thanks some very interesting stuff, I had a VTwin Sachs up to the beginning of this year, with a Yamaha Virago V twin engine.

Just 4 U Nuno(Bristol Fighter)Barn stormers. 

Chris Martin
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Maybe Nuno can chase this one up for us and find a real winner. I was walking through the old part of Albufeira back in '78 when I noticed the 'Bombeiros' at the fire station. Back then it was in the old part of town near the fish market. They had a fairly modern Chevrolet C10 (or similar) parked at the side of the road ready for action, but I did notice parked inside behind it was a large pre-war Mercedes-Benz fire engine. It had a long, very high red engine cover and a massive plated radiator typical of the biggest classic Mercedes from the late twenties or early thirties. Lots of big shiny things, tall wheels and tyres, a monster of a thing. I wouldn't be surprised if was supercharged too. I do not even know if it was built on a car or more likely a truck chassis, but it looked well looked after and regularly polished even if it was no longer in service. If Carraciola was ever a fireman this would have been his wheels.

Anyway, I passed that way a few times over the next few years and often wondered what happened to it, but the Bombeiros had moved to a modern grey concrete and steel station up the hill near the main N125 road, and whenever I passed, it was always locked up with the shiny new red roller doors down and no old motors on show. I do not even know if it was built on a car or more likely a truck chassis, but either way if it still exists it would be a major 'barn find'. Maybe next time you are down south Nuno, you could make enquiries?

Meanwhile, I have a few more motoring memories of Portugal so I am starting a new thread over in 'Non-classic matters' if anyone wants to share their memories of driving there or around Europe.

Chris M.

 

Super1600
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Rather than a barn find, or such thing, my brother has a rather extensive collection of cars (80+ at last count).  Mostly either Italian (Fiat, Lancia or Alfa or Mercedes but a few else in sheds etc.  Now if I can figure out how to add photos I will so you can see what he has.

 

Forza Alfa Romeo

redranch
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Thanks for the comments Chris..."My comment above was to thank redranch for posting what looked like some
real 'barn finds' by which most old car people mean a reasonably
complete and restorable old classic car that has been left in storage
awaiting re-discovery (although even he was pushing it a bit with that
rusted Trans-Am shell)"

In fact I have this slight problem with old cars...I keep buying wreck thinking I can save them, so I bought all of those wrecks apart from the 56 Eldorado which belongs to a friend of mine (we dragged that one out of a field in Arkansas). The Aston was partially restored before I was offered an amount I couldn't refuse, the Jensen was cleaned up and sold on to someone who wanted to restore it, the 59 Cadillac was stolen from it's storage unit in Oklahoma and never seen again, the 54 Lincoln actually had a parts car that cwas included, I sold the first Lincoln and the parts car was sold to a friend who brought it back to the UK)..and that leaves the 69 Pontiac Trans Am...Chris I know you said I was pushing it a bit with the TA, but my reason for posting the photo was that unlike some of the other rust buckets shown in the various postings, this rust bucket was a 1968 Pontiac Trans Am RamAit lV, one of only 689 cars...so a rare car.

Here are a few photos of the car all back together and in primer just before it was sold...the last photo shows the car in primer on the left and on the right as it was originally. I managed to track down the previous owners and they sent me photos of the car when they owned it back in the 70's. 

Cheers

Peter

69 Trans Am69 Trans Am

 

 

 


Chris Martin
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Just kidding Peter, I know exactly how rare a '69 TransAm is. I think I posted this picture before, but this was one I was surprised to find in the late seventies in Golders Green. I was in a '66 Mustang when I found it, but my mate at the time had a '69 Firebird Formula 400 and another had a '69 Z/28 so we knew what it was.

While I was taking photos (on my crappy old Kodak Instamatic, hence the poor quality) the owner came out, and yes he assured us it was the real thing, although I doubt there would have been much interest in faking one anyway back then, most people were going for big wheels and sidepipes. He also showed us a genuine Shelby KR500 in the garage on the right side behind the Poncho, but my attempted photos of that one came out too dark.

Still, it was a job well done to rebuild a car from that shell!

Chris M.