Future Average Joe's Classic Car Blog (a consideration of future "classic" status of cars made after 1980)

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Chris Martin
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Ok, agreed. I know your logic rings true, it always has worked that way so far, hence the current crop of fifty-somethings paying over the odds for E-Type Jags and Cobras etc, and in reverse, that is why the once flourishing Model T clubs are losing members fast, the original group for whom they were 'nostalgic' are now in their eighties and dying off. This has always been the case, and probably will continue to drive the market.

Also, agreed, Ford Escort - bland and over-priced, never mind the hot ones, any rust free two door model will do as a shell to build on. Again, there must be many of a certain age group that will want to relive the competition successes of the blue oval from a certain period.

Maybe I have not explained my thinking well enough,(  I do that often ) but let me try again.

The perceived value of a hot car with a bit of competition cred' as it's main attraction is only temporary and in this regard the Japanese have outdone themselves. No sooner is a new improved hotter version in the showroom and cleaning up on the rally stages than there is another even better. more powerful, faster version of the previously dominant model on sale; hence the WRX v Evo wars of recent times. But then our young hot car fan - the theoretical Average Joe of tomorrow - gets confused, or at least loses that temporary allegiance to the so-called "brand Loyalty" I mentioned elsewhere.

The attention span of youngsters these days is transitory at best, and if they can't find the WRX they once lusted after, the more glamorous surviving Porsches, Beemers or Corvettes may quickly usurp their wallet's attention.

All of what has gone before may prove me wrong, and there is a market for these cars to become the next "classic" generation. My thoughts are that while in the past it took a lot more effort to impress someone, and persuade them to be loyal to a particular brand, the generation of which you speak attach as much importance to their chosen brand of automobile as they do to a choice between Hungry Jacks/Burger King or McDonalds, in fact they probably focus more on what is the top 'phone, laptop, tablet, ipad or whatever.

If my theory is right, the consumer's emotional attachment to their brand of car, will be about the same as their chosen brand of electronic goods - ie "No Future" to quote Johny Rotten. These days all things are temporary, not made, or marketed, to last.

I doubt the nostalgia of a few testosteroned teenagers will be enough to save these cars.

I am not saying that technologically these cars are in any way less significant than any others from their era, just that the marketing of same is, and always was, a short-term view for quick sales, without any built in long-term interest.

As I said, (if this old fart is around for another ten or twenty years) I would be glad to be proved wrong.

I hope I have stated my case clearly enough as I am getting bored with the whole story. I know there are many who would like to oppose my views, but at least let them first read and understand what I am saying here.

Chris M.

 

Gruffalo
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Joined: 2011-07-30

 “... I hope I have stated my case
clearly enough as I am getting bored with the whole story. I know there are
many who would like to oppose my views, but at least let them first read and
understand what I am saying here...”

You’re stating your case very clearly and what I’m hearing is you’re not
only dismissing the cars youngsters of today are into, but you’re dismissing
the generation as whole! Have you interacted socially with anybody under the
age of 25 recently?

I’ve read all of this thread and you’ve been very critical of previous
posters views and opinions, so if you’re getting bored of the whole story, it’s
most likely that you’re running out of arguments to back up your prejudiced views.

Refer to my earlier comment about the generation gap. Many "Baby Boomers" still believe anything built in Japan is “jap crap”. I grew up
in the 80’s and recall magazine articles saying as much about everything from
that part of the world. Truth is, from the late 80’s onwards the Euro manufacturers
had to sit up and take notice.

So, to try and get the thread back on track... future classics for the
“Average Joe” built from the 80’s on? I won’t include anything mentioned
previously as it’s already been discussed, so here’s 5 “could be’s”

  1. Honda Integra Type R – the original one, good tidy ones
    are worth big bucks.
  2. Toyota Supra – from the 80’s, not the ugly 90’s one.
  3. Renault Clio – The hot ones, Cup/172 etc.
  4. Nissan Silvia/200SX – a fine handling rear drive coupe.
    Find a tidy original one...
  5. Peugeot 306 GTi6 – the last decent car Peugeot made.

I’ll confess to not knowing enough about American
cars to comment on them, but I think it goes without saying the Corvette,
Camaro and Mustang will always have cult classic status. Likewise in Australia
the Falcon and Commodore have a big fan base already.

And I haven’t bothered with the usual premium
Euro brands as they are likely to follow on from their predecessors and attain
classic status by default, likewise the 80’s hot hatches as they’re already
classics.

Nuno Granja
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Joined: 2011-09-13

 

"You’re stating your case very clearly and what I’m hearing is you’re not

only dismissing the cars youngsters of today are into, but you’re dismissing
the generation as whole! Have you interacted socially with anybody under the
age of 25 recently?"

 

Sorry Chris but Gruffalo is right, and the question makes all the sense.

 

 

nuno granja

Chris Martin
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Joined: 2011-08-20

Gruffalo wrote:

 “... I hope I have stated my case clearly enough as I am getting bored with the whole story. I know there are many who would like to oppose my views, but at least let them first read and understand what I am saying here...”

You’re stating your case very clearly and what I’m hearing is you’re not only dismissing the cars youngsters of today are into, but you’re dismissing the generation as whole! Have you interacted socially with anybody under the age of 25 recently?

I’ve read all of this thread and you’ve been very critical of previous posters views and opinions, so if you’re getting bored of the whole story, it’s most likely that you’re running out of arguments to back up your prejudiced views.

Refer to my earlier comment about the generation gap. Many "Baby Boomers" still believe anything built in Japan is “jap crap”. I grew up in the 80’s and recall magazine articles saying as much about everything from that part of the world. Truth is, from the late 80’s onwards the Euro manufacturers had to sit up and take notice.

So, to try and get the thread back on track... future classics for the “Average Joe” built from the 80’s on? I won’t include anything mentioned previously as it’s already been discussed, so here’s 5 “could be’s”

  1. Honda Integra Type R – the original one, good tidy ones are worth big bucks.
  2. Toyota Supra – from the 80’s, not the ugly 90’s one.
  3. Renault Clio – The hot ones, Cup/172 etc.
  4. Nissan Silvia/200SX – a fine handling rear drive coupe. Find a tidy original one...
  5. Peugeot 306 GTi6 – the last decent car Peugeot made.

I’ll confess to not knowing enough about American cars to comment on them, but I think it goes without saying the Corvette, Camaro and Mustang will always have cult classic status. Likewise in Australia the Falcon and Commodore have a big fan base already.

And I haven’t bothered with the usual premium Euro brands as they are likely to follow on from their predecessors and attain classic status by default, likewise the 80’s hot hatches as they’re already classics.

Ok to answer your points individually Gruffalo here goes;

You’re stating your case very clearly and what I’m hearing is you’re not only dismissing the cars youngsters of today are into, but you’re dismissing the generation as whole! Have you interacted socially with anybody under the age of 25 recently?

Thanks, I am trying to state my thoughts, (case is too strong a word, we are not in court) and glad they are clear, but I do not see where you get the idea I am dismissing a generation.  If I need to justify myself in that regard, I drove two hours each way to the south coast of NSW to attend a niece's 21st birthday party at the weekend, and if being surrounded by a house full of her mates made me an oldie that is hardly my fault.  The weekend before I spent two hours giving another niece (aged 20) driving lessons around some of the quieter roads around here as she does not have the confidence yet to venture on to the Sydney streets where she lives.  My observations about what types of youngsters drive what types of cars are just that - observations.

I’ve read all of this thread and you’ve been very critical of previous posters views and opinions, so if you’re getting bored of the whole story, it’s most likely that you’re running out of arguments to back up your prejudiced views.

Please explain where I have been critical of previous posters views and opinions, just because my opinions differ, there is no reason for anyone to take that personally, the only personal remark I have noticed in this thread so far came from another who labelled drivers of certain cars as 'jerks'.  As for my views being prejudiced, yes indeed, if prejudiced is taken to mean a preconceived opinion, or bias (see Oxford English Dictionary) surely everyone's views are exactly that, based on their own ideas conceived as they are by time and experience, and of course my experiences are different from yours.  That is as it should be, surely?

Refer to my earlier comment about the generation gap. Many "Baby Boomers" still believe anything built in Japan is “jap crap”. I grew up in the 80’s and recall magazine articles saying as much about everything from that part of the world. Truth is, from the late 80’s onwards the Euro manufacturers had to sit up and take notice.

I was well aware of the 'Jap crap' jibes back in the eighties,  I was at the time in the motor trade myself in the UK, and witnessed hands-on the growth of the market share of the Japanese brands, and if I too was guilty of sneering at the Datsun Cherrys of the mid-seventies, we all soon woke up to the fact that they were taking over by offering a better product, and given the disaster that was the British motor industry at the time, particularly the sad remains of BL and the Chrysler/Rootes models it is not surprising the Japanese took the largest share.  My only disagreement with that remark is I would suggest the other manufacturers would (or should anyway) have been taking notice a lot earlier than the late 80s.  As I stated earlier, I am not against Japanese cars just because of their country of origin.  My points regarding future classics apply to most cars marketed since the eighties as disposable 'white goods' whether from the bread-and-butter Euro brands or the emerging Asian manufacturers.  Any cases I stated naming specific Japanese models was only in response to the original post's inclusion of those models.  Most of the points made apply equally to a Ford Focus.

So, to try and get the thread back on track... future classics for the “Average Joe” built from the 80’s on? I won’t include anything mentioned previously as it’s already been discussed, so here’s 5 “could be’s”

No need to try to get the thread back on track, it was not off it.  All debate so far has been entirely 'on track' given the original question posted by Isaiah.  Your list of 5 contenders is at last a welcome addition to what has been mentioned so far.  Just because I still believe very few of certain cars will achieve 'classic' status and therefore be worth saving does not mean they will not.  And even if I am right on that score, it does not mean I am denigrating those cars, or their fans; I am sure they all do a great job of giving the owner whatever he wants from a car, I just have my doubts about the future preservation of same in any significant numbers.  As I have repeatedly stated, these are MY views and opinions, and it still surprises me how easily some people take personal offence when someone else disagrees with their choice of favourite cars.  I have mentioned elsewhere my reasons why I have mostly used Mercedes models from the 70s and 80s, but I do not feel the need to defend my tastes to those who prefer other cars.  Nor would I ever want the variety of old cars that people preserve to be restricted to just those that meet certain criteria. As an example if I said my favourite car might be a Facel Vega HK500, I am not advocating that all others should be judged against that, nor am I suggesting I would like to see a lot more of them on the road.  It is the individuality of each car, it's design, it's pedigree or the engineering underneath that make that variety and long may it remain so; I have always preferred those big mixed up car shows to the one make club affairs where everyone has brought the same car, but again, that is just an OPINION, so no need to leap to the defence of one  make clubs either.

To sum up the thread so far: Isaiah asked what cars we thought would be the classics of the future for 'Average Joe'.  I took his notion of Average Joe to mean an ordinary person of ordinary means who enjoys the old car hobby but does not have the means to collect Bugattis or Bentleys.  He suggested these cars would be selected from models of the last thirty years.  A fair enough question, my points raised previously regarding the reliance on plastics and computer chips applies to most modern cars regardless of their country of origin, although possibly more relevant to those from the last 15 to 20 years rather than those from the 80s.  If I am wrong, it will be because some enterprising engineering businesses spring up around clever electronics engineers who are able to remake, copy, or otherwise supply the parts needed after the manufacturers have deleted the spares from thier inventory.  There is already a growing number of small operators who specialise in plastic welding to repair bumpers and body panels, so maybe there will be a niche for remanfacturing the needed plastic mouldings too, but this will all depend on the demand.  Coincidentally the day after I suggested the example of the first generation Mustang was supported by a massive spares and restoration industry, I noticed there was a story on the 'Newsfeed' page about new bodyshells being made for the '67 convertible.  I have my doubts this story will be repeated in thirty years time regarding any of the models mentioned in this thread, but as I have said before - I may be wrong!

All of which leads me to believe the list of potential late model classics for Joe to choose from will be quite small.

For those who take their car of choice to heart and are offended whenever another does not share their enthusiasm, all I can say is it maybe best if you refrain from reading public forums

And finally, there was supposed to be a certain measure of humour in my previous posts, I apologise to those who do not see it - I must try harder to get my meaning across.

Gotta go now, Django needs his afternoon walk.

Chris M.

 

 

 

 

Gruffalo
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Chris, that’s quite a spiel. Good on you for getting all that off your chest.

I may have taken your posts a little more literally than you intended, but to be fair, the tone in many of them come across as, at best authoritative and worst, quite challenging/aggressive.

Maybe something was “Lost in Translation”...

Never mind we’re all grownups so let’s just put it behind us eh?

So, can you (or anyone) add another 5 to my list? Some obscurities from the 80’s and 90’s maybe?