Scale models of classic cars.

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Nuno Granja
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Nos some commercial vehicles from Renault,

 

Tow Goliaths, a van from a spanish beer company...

...and small truck from "Sumol" a once famous portuguese juice brand...

 

An two Estaffetes once a very popular sight in french streets... and police stations. I hope that one day I will find one version "des flics".

 

to be continued

 

 

nuno granja

Nuno Granja
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To finish with Renault, two models of Saviem Renault.

 

A  truck based van...

And an "african desert cab"...

 

Now thw family photos (the Sumol Goliath is not on the photos as is a later acquisition)...

 

Civilian...

Competition

Ligh commercial and taxis...

Commercial...

Next brand, Citroen

nuno granja

Nuno Granja
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Before startinf to post Citroen family, two models with no relatives on my shelf...

 

A Pegaso Z-102, from a company better know by theys trucks and the brainchild of Wifred Ricart. From my point of view one of the best looking 50's cars . We have one at Portugal that came here as a gift from spanish dictator Franco to the portuguese president Carveiro Lopes during an official visit to Spain. Craveiro Lopes never use the car but his son do it to the fiull extent. Imagine the effect of this young boy driving in 50's Lisbon  in such a beautifull car... and nobody else have another one.

 

Now an improbable rally contender, the DAF 55..

 

 

nuno granja

DUESIE
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I like the Pegaso story. My dad never gave me a Pegaso to get around London in, what a shame. I suppose Mario could come in here with the full story of that one.

Nuno Granja
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DUSIE,

Maybe you dont understand portuguese, but anyway more info about our national Z-102...

http://aeiou.volante.pt/teste-ao-pegaso-z-102=f1956

 

http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francisco_Craveiro_Lopes

From wikipedia the tex about that Pegaso...

"O Generalíssimo Franco ofereceu em Maio de 1953, quando este visitou oficialmente a Espanha, um automóvel Pegaso, na altura, um topo de gama desportivo, orgulho da indústria automóvel espanhola. Porque o General Craveiro Lopes, homem de grande honestidade e escrúpulo, não desejava conservar presentes recebidos durante o seu mandato de imediato o registou, em 5 de Abril de 1954, em nome do Estado Português, Presidência da República. Foi poucas vezes utilizado pelo General Craveiro Lopes mas o seu filho, Capitão Aviador João Carlos Craveiro Lopes, rodou alguns milhares de quilómetros até que em 1958, quando o Almirante Américo Tomás foi eleito Presidente da República, o Pegaso ficou imobilizado no Palácio de Belém. Mais tarde foi transferido para um armazém do Ministério das Finanças, em Xabregas, onde veio a sofrer graves danos com as inundações que assolaram Lisboa, em Novembro de 1967. Acabou por ser recuperado nas Oficinas Gerais de Material Aeronáutico de Alverca, obtendo-se um perfeito restauro na forma original. Encontra-se actualmente exposto no Museu do Automóvel do Caramulo em Portugal."

 

 

nuno granja

DUESIE
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Thanks for the explanation. My Portugese is limited to the usual tourist level. Once the basics are understood, it is not hard to read for anyone who has learned other Latin languages like Spanish or Italian. I first learned a bit as a teenager in odd circumstances during hospital visits. My father was paralysed with a severe spinal injury and was in hospital in traction for several weeks. He always had an interest in learning languages and because some of the hospital staff were Portugese and he was effectively a prisoner he taught himself with their help. To our British ears though I do find it easier to listen to the Brazilian tongue, but maybe that is just because of my taste in old Astrud Gilberto records! So, at least the car is still there in the museum, I had assumed it would be in some priceless American or Japanese collection by now. Did what had been the property of the president's and governement officials become public property after the revolution?

Nuno Granja
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DUSIE,

The president Craveiro Lopes, registered the car as a  portuguese republic property and barely used it. His son used it extensively until 1958, when the father left de presidence. After that it stay stored at the  presidence garage and other governement stores and in late 60's suffer from big Tejo (river) floods. It was restored to present (running) condition at the government aeronautical workshop and some time after that given to the only portuguese classic car museum, here it stays today.

 

Now some Citroens from my shelf, 

Three Tractions, know at Portugal as the "arrastadeira". Arrastadeira  in portuguese means something that drag itself over the ground in a stable move. Two are taxis and one civilian,  all say they are "11" but the civilian one have a long bonnet.

One taxi from Barcelona...

Another taxi that i can't remember the origin...

 

and the "civilian...

 

To be continued...

 

nuno granja

NIGA
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Nuno, the Spanish T11 was sold here as Madrid taxi from 1955 and the Blue-Beige as Saigon taxi also from 1955.


Nuno Granja
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Thanks NIGA,

You are right about that 11 being from  Madrid and not from Barcelona. Thats my mistake and this time the origin is not my dyslexia...

nuno g

Nuno Granja
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More Citroens,

Now the 2 cilinder range, an  "humbrella on wheels" from the first séries...

 

A late one this time with the canvas roof closed...

 

The AMI, an up-market evolution with over the same mechanical lay-out,  and a big commercial sucess.

 

... and a  modernised version of the original car. At Portuguese streets early 2CVs was  never a commun sight, but the Dyane was a big sucess during the 70's.  After the demise of the Dyane,  the portuguese build 2CVs become very commun ...

To be continued...

 

 

nuno granja