Stateside cars - viable option?

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rolymo35
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Funny you mentioned  the exhaust tone or should I say "loudness" the V8/ 289 mustang is the only car  in which I was stopped by the German Polizie  at the border going into Germany and refused entry . Not allowed to cross the border until the loud sound  was rectified . I was directed back down the autobahn into Belgium to get it fixed, the next problem was it being Sunday everywhere was closed, We cheated by driving up country to the next border crossing and crept across very quietly with no revs ( just in cruise mode) and held our breath !!

RolyMo

mrtotty
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DUESIE wrote:

I am still amazed by posters who come on here and put in their half thought out idea without reading the post they are replying to. I said above that the sixes were a less expensive option, it therefore follows if one can buy a car cheaper, one would also expect to sell it cheaper. No?

Heavens, that's a little harsh, isn't it?

My point was that while the sixes are certainly cheaper, they are cheaper because they are less desirable. I would thus imagine that the difference in purchase/reselling price would thus be greater for a six than it would be for a V8, for which there will always be a ready classic market and buoyant resale prices.

Horses for courses, of course. The Mustang six is still a very pleasant car indeed. It's just that American sixes don't have the aural qualities of contemporary British or European ones, though, of course, the 170/200 sixes were very basic Falcon engines and not the least bit sporty.

 

DUESIE
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Sorry if it seemed harsh, my point is that within the ongoing debate it goes without saying further that the Mustangs, as well as other American models, discussed so far, are usually assumed to be the V8 versions. Given that the original question referred to gas guzzling yanks, I was just pointing out the cheaper alternatives. There are many who would like a full-on V8 performance model, but as the popularity of the Mustang has soared again it makes sense to look at the sixes as bargains. Some would like to make a noise, but as a lot of Mustangs are now sold just for the pose value it is worth considering whether you really need to pay top money for a suburban cruiser. It has never been easier to import from the States and for those that would like an original car without big mags, loud pipes or cliched stripes it makes sense to weigh up all the options. Of course some want that Dodge Custon Royal just so they can say they have a 'Hemi' under the hood, and a GTO would not be the same without a 389 and triple carbs, but not all American car fans want to burn rubber.

mrtotty
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A fair point, especially given the price of V8 Mustangs in Britain now. Decent convertibles, admittedly the most desirable, are £25,000 plus.

I know what you mean about the really big V8's, though. I'd only ever want a basic 289 in a Mustang. A 390 would be overkill in this country.

rolymo35
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 Why does it have to be a Mustang ? there are plenty of reasonably priced alternatives, I had a great time cruising around in one of these ;- Plymouth  " Barracuda" coupe with a 360ci V8 on automatic, easy to work on , easy and cheap on parts , good on gas (20 plus mph most of the time). always good for a traffic light burn-up !

RolyMo

mrtotty
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I suppose it's because the Mustang is the most numerous American classic and so easy to look after given the excellent spares situation.

That isn't to say, of course, that any other alternative is less worthy. The Barracuda you cite is a great car and the 360 a great engine.

Of course, the ultimate is the Hemi 426, which I think was available in the Barracuda, though if anyone knows otherwise, feel free to correct me.

Chris Martin
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Then of course, if it is just good looks you are after, you can't go far wrong with a Buick. Through the years, from the twenties on to the seventies they were always stylish.

Just a handful of the local Buicks I have photographed recently. Of course, there are a lot more, but let's have some of yours on here.

Chris M.

 

valamys
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Joined: 2014-01-20

That's awesome Chris. It's not cabrio? pariuri247.com

rsk289
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Well... a Mustang has a definite size advantage.  I have a '68 fastback, originally 289 and now a stroked 351W (to 392) with a 5-speed.  Although not exactly a daily driver, I've done 25,000 miles in it over the last 6 years or so, so it's been around (Prague, Oslo, Lisbon etc.).  These days, when I park it in town, it looks positively diminutive next to the average modern.  All the Audi tonka-toys etc. tower over it - even a modern Renault Clio makes it look small.  The only difference these days is the length of the overhangs.  Over the last 1,000 miles it's averaged 21mpg, better than my mate's newish Range Rover.

And I do like the noise it makes - saves on having a car stereo.