When did you last seen one of those?

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Diplomat
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Mario Laguna wrote:

Alicante, October 2011

Fiat Tempra

Made in Spain Peugeot 205

Renault Super 5 GTX 90hp

 

It's strange to think that just a few years ago, these would've been considered scrap by many, but out of nowhere, they become rare future classics.

I went down to Devon last week, and it's amazing how many original Micras, Rover Metros and Peugeot 205s, 309s and 405s are still knocking about. I'm tempted to buy a couple of them and run them for a little while. It could be a good investment.

Nuno Granja
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Diplomat,

In my point of view, I  did not agree  with you, as most of those cars (Micras, Rover Metros and Peugeot 205s, 309s and 405s) will never get a decent values in the next years.

You will spend more and more money to keep them in good contition during these years, than any kind o profit that you will get, and god only knows when.

Even the  keepers of top of the range models like the Super5 Gt Turbo o Peugeot 205 GTI will strugle to have any big profit, Of course that top of the range models d'ont depreciate and will worth  better values in future, but the money to restore and maintain them will be high.

nuno granja

Nuno Granja
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Fresh catch at Lisbon...

As anyone who view   the Top Gear atempt to destroy a Toyota Pick-up or  watch the images taken this days on the streets of Libia know, this japanese workhorses are die hard vehicles. One exemple "hand painted"..

nuno granja

Diplomat
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Nuno Granja wrote:

Diplomat,

In my point of view, I  did not agree  with you, as most of those cars (Micras, Rover Metros and Peugeot 205s, 309s and 405s) will never get a decent values in the next years.

You will spend more and more money to keep them in good contition during these years, than any kind o profit that you will get, and god only knows when.

Even the  keepers of top of the range models like the Super5 Gt Turbo o Peugeot 205 GTI will strugle to have any big profit, Of course that top of the range models d'ont depreciate and will worth  better values in future, but the money to restore and maintain them will be high.

nuno granja

Fair point, but it's a shame to scrap cars that are becoming an increasingly rare sight on the roads.

Chris Martin
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Nuno Granja wrote:

Diplomat,

In my point of view, I  did not agree  with you, as most of those cars (Micras, Rover Metros and Peugeot 205s, 309s and 405s) will never get a decent values in the next years.

You will spend more and more money to keep them in good contition during these years, than any kind o profit that you will get, and god only knows when.

Even the  keepers of top of the range models like the Super5 Gt Turbo o Peugeot 205 GTI will strugle to have any big profit, Of course that top of the range models d'ont depreciate and will worth  better values in future, but the money to restore and maintain them will be high.

nuno granja

I agree completely Nuno.

These ordinary cars will have no future. The main difference between anonymous modern tin-boxes and earlier classics is due to different market conditions. In recent times, over the last thirty years give or take, both the car buyers and the manufacturers have changed their attitudes such that most cars now, with a few exceptions are made as cheaply as possible to have a limited lifespan as disposable white goods. With fashions changing daily and manufacturers unwilling to supply replacement plastic parts or electronic chips once a model is ten years old, these are out of date long before nostalgia comes around to make them desirable to the generation that grew up with them. Buyers too have changed, and marque loyalty went out with the seventies to be replaced by the 'how many gizmos and gimmicks can I get for the least money' approach which is where Hyundai and the like have beaten the Japanese at their own game. But the Koreans will not have long to enjoy their success. The future is now Chinese and I don't see a rush of speculators hoarding last year's models just because they will all be extinct in five or ten years.

As for the argument that some are becoming rare, so what? Some cars deserve to be rare, Just because nobody wanted them when new, and therefore few survive, reaching it's twentieth birthday also does not confer the title of Classic on a car.

Some even deserve to be extinct - Fiat Tempra anyone?

Anyway, why are we even having this conversation on the C&SC forum. Most of these shown above have no claim to any 'Classic' status, now, or in the future.

James started this thread with a photo of a Renault Espace, for good reason, it started a whole new genre of car design, but most of what has followed since has just been nostalgia for forgotten cars that have no claim to fame except they are now not as common as they were.

Chris M.

 

 

Nuno Granja
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Chris Martin,

I just said a few words about what I think of making profits with some kind of cars in the near future. If they become a classics sooner or later it's another history and in this subject arguments can be very diferent from one enthusiast to another. In my opinion, if you wants some car and can afford it,,,,buy it and enjoy before the petrol suply ends.

nuno g

Chris Martin
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Nuno Granja wrote:

Chris Martin,

I just said a few words about what I think of making profits with some kind of cars in the near future. If they become a classics sooner or later it's another history and in this subject arguments can be very diferent from one enthusiast to another. In my opinion, if you wants some car and can afford it,,,,buy it and enjoy before the petrol suply ends.

nuno g

Diplomat suggests they could be a good investment, you disagree, I also disagree but go further and say they are not, nor ever will be 'future classics', but my interest is. as I said, in CLASSIC cars, not redundant shopping hacks. And if you are right and the petrol supply will not be around much longer that is all the more reason to remember cars worth remembering.

Chris M.

 

Nuno Granja
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Ok... back on topic...

A BMW E30 320 IS, some kind a E30 M3 entry level model  for those who can´t afford the real thing, a car from the 80's that will get up in value in a near future, but  allways behind of the M3,. This one is at that dangerous point between the "old banger" and  "youngtimer/classic" statuts. At this point anything could apens, it could be scraped or it could be restored. From now is the proud and joy of young fellow who live in next quarter from mine at Lisbon...

 

nuno granja

Nuno Granja
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Frash catch from Lisnon...

To old Alfas who become rare this days, and even more if in good original condition  as this ones...

One 75 (here the "1.6L IE" entry level model)  the last RWD Alfa Romeo may have a better future as a classic...

 

...than the 33,

nuno granja

James Elliott
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Thanks to David Evans, we in the C&SC office see one of these fairly regularly, but it's been a while since I saw one in the wild.

 

n/a