When did you last seen one of those?

207 replies [Last post]
rolymo35
rolymo35's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-06-02

Could you please quit with all these commercials, tatty old Euro-box remains and cars that started life with a life expectanancy of less than 7 years, this magazine is supposed to be for classic's and sports cars ,

RolyMo

GBt
GBt's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-06-01

Hang on a Mo Roly, should  the Belaro not be under this section,


The Good The Bad and The Ugly, no not a Clint Eastwood Spaghetti Western, I'm taliking Kit Cars here...

 its a kit of parts panels car , supposedly in the Fashion of an 80s Testa Rossa, but apart from being  based on the mid engined Pontiac Fierro, the only other similarity to  Ferraris being that Fierros had a reputation for catching fire, as the O rings would contract in certain temperature scenarios and fuel would escape and ignite on the hot manifolds, as would many of the latest 458 Italias, which set fire to the material between the wheel arches and exhausts, I believe.Maybe one could have some Fierro panels fabricated and make a Classic ultra rare Pontiac lookalike,out of an Italia.

Nuno Granja
Nuno Granja's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-09-13

Good point Gbt

 

 

Anyway, fresh catch.

A BMW E21 323i, the top of the range of that series, spotted today in Lisbon area on the the way to surfing.

It is  another 80's BMW who will become a classic, now its only a entering the youngtimer "class". This one seems to be in very good original condition and the driver and co-driver are guaranteed from the era.

This cars start to have a strong follow here and values start to rise slowly. 

 

nuno granja

rolymo35
rolymo35's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-06-02

Another load of grotty old euro boxes ,first time you go to a parts store for a replacement ECU or a turn-signal switch and they tell you sorry sir

"discontinued item " or just even the price alone  that will be sufficient to discourage anyone from the desire to drive one of these  into classic status ( love um and leave um )

RolyMo

Nuno Granja
Nuno Granja's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-09-13

rolymo35,

In my opinion the availability of spares for a car is not a major criterion to define if a car have a potential as a classic or as a future classic.

Talking about a classic sports car.... A Buggati 35, is not a eurobox and i if you go to a  Bugatti dealar today, to buy for exemple an head gasket, they will not say "sorry sir discontinued item", probably  they will say "What ?!?!?!".

Talking about an eurobox..

You can buy any item to a Mercedes 123 from Mercedes Benz official dealer, you  even can buy a second hand revised example from Mercedes Benz Classic Dept, as you can read on a Martin Buckley article on a CSC past number ...

 

But as I say in the beginning, its just my opinion and of course there are other opinions.

nuno granja

 

DUESIE
Offline
Joined: 2011-07-06

Well Nuno I am with Roly on this one.

The type of anonymous eighties cars that you like to photograph will be scrapped as soon as their value falls below that of whatever component fails next. So if a certain model BMW for example is worth maybe 500 quid and the only supplier for a replacement ECU is BMW who want 501 for it that is the end of the line. With current greenie policies that means completely scrapped and recycled, nothing left to rebuild in thirty years time, and nobody is going to waste the time or space to put any of these in storage.

No apologies for opinions here, just facts.

Very few if any of these eighties BMW saloons, VW Golfs and Sciroccos except MK 1 GTis, Citroen BXs and Renaults, Opels or even Ford Escorts except RS and Mexico will be saved, and nor will they be missed. In fact I suspect the Ford Transits you photographed stand a better chance of acheiving classic status.

 

Nuno Granja
Nuno Granja's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-09-13

Well  Dusie, another opinion and thank you for sharing..

Maybe you have a little reason, but that's natural selection working and not a  fate over some models, and I'm sure that a  Mercedes 123 have more spares available at official dealers than a a Bugatti 35.

Since the beginning of this industry, only a very small part of the models produced in large scale survive, even if some as Beetles or Minis survive more than the others. I think that in the future we  will keep seing E21s, BXs and Alfas 75, but of course in small numbers.

I take those pics by pleasure, as souvenir before most of them disappear, I know they are no classics (yet) and I share them here under my interpretation of this topic purpose.

nuno granja

 

mikeC
mikeC's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-10-29

DUESIE wrote:

Well Nuno I am with Roly on this one.

The type of anonymous eighties cars that you like to photograph will be scrapped as soon as their value falls below that of whatever component fails next. So if a certain model BMW for example is worth maybe 500 quid and the only supplier for a replacement ECU is BMW who want 501 for it that is the end of the line. With current greenie policies that means completely scrapped and recycled, nothing left to rebuild in thirty years time, and nobody is going to waste the time or space to put any of these in storage.

No apologies for opinions here, just facts.

Very few if any of these eighties BMW saloons, VW Golfs and Sciroccos except MK 1 GTis, Citroen BXs and Renaults, Opels or even Ford Escorts except RS and Mexico will be saved, and nor will they be missed. In fact I suspect the Ford Transits you photographed stand a better chance of acheiving classic status.

 

 

Just remember that, back in the 1960s, we said no-one would save cars of the fifties because there would be no source of curved glass for windscreens, and no-one would be able to source seals for hydraulics... Didn't happen, did it? Fact is, there will be ways round parts sourcing if the demand is there. I heard of a recent model BMW that needed an electronic unit replacing at over £1,000 plus labour; the owner solved the problem with a £2 item from Maplins and about five hours of his own time.

Nuno Granja
Nuno Granja's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-09-13

 

mikeC,

Good point!

Now 20 years foward...

In the 80's, in the portuguese classic cars circles, with a few exceptions they assure the same about VW aircooled cars, a Beetle will never be a classic and a Type 2 was a worst case with no chances at all.

A curious photo taken during 92' in the day i buy my Type 3 Squareback from a scrapyard. We could see laying down on the background, a Type 2 Split "25 Windows" Samba. The regular Type 2 Combi, Panel Vans and Pick-ups are very popular in Portugal, but the Samba 23 or 25 windows are really rare. At that time i have allready a Type 2 Split Combi from '63 and a  Type 1 Beetle from 73 (we could see the rear side of that car on the left), both in a very good condition, so I look at that Samba on the scrapyard with curiosity and move on as I have no interest and dont know anyone with interest in it.

 

20 years on and a portuguese Type 2 Samba, the less valuable 23 windows version, in good condition but not concours, was sold at Padova recently for a  shade under 50.000eur.

 

(this photo was taken on location by my friend João Bento, a italian car nuts and 70's Fiat expert)

nuno granja

GBt
GBt's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-06-01

OK so maybe this theme should have gone under other matters, not in the Classics chat section,

 I cannot remember the last time I saw a Mark 2 Scirocco in the raw. 

even if superior to the ferrous Oxide prone(rust prone)Karmann built Mark I, that preceded the Mark I Golf by a half year, to test out the mechanicals, before going mainstream with new compact family size to VW concept FWD drive Golf, it would have seemed a more likely candidate for scrapping, and the last Scirocco of any type I remember seeing, was at least ten years ago and that was a previous neighbour's immaculate Mark 1 1600GLS, as opposed to the injected 1600 and 1800 injected ones badged as GLi , (except for the Storm versionof course ).