When is a classic not a classic?

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plastic penguin
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Some muse that classic cars are like fine wine (so I'm reliably informed), they just get better with age. There are those, on the flip-side, that age disgracefully.

About twenty years ago a friend of mine sold his Triumph Dolly 1850 for a Fiat 131 Mirafiori. As I write this I am wincing at the dreadful deed committed all those years ago.

Whic classic cars, in your opinion(s), should've been consigned to the skip?

Yours painfully, pp (big smile)

Dinsdale Piranha
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In my opinion, MGBs, I realise that 99% of people will disagree but then that's the great thing about opinions.

Strangely I would love a Mirafiori, many happy memories of one owned by a friend just after we started driving. He wasn't the most mechanically minded of chaps, he confused a few of us by complaining how long it took to top up the oil.  After a demonstration we pointed out that pouring it down the dipstick hole was probably not the most efficient method.

plastic penguin
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Dinsdale Piranha wrote:

In my opinion, MGBs, I realise that 99% of people will disagree but then that's the great thing about opinions.

Strangely I would love a Mirafiori, many happy memories of one owned by a friend just after we started driving. He wasn't the most mechanically minded of chaps, he confused a few of us by complaining how long it took to top up the oil.  After a demonstration we pointed out that pouring it down the dipstick hole was probably not the most efficient method.

Quick story: About 20-odd years ago a friend and I were looking around for replacement cars and I saw this SuperMirafiori for sale in Sydenham, SE London. It was about 18 miles round trip and thought it was worth a look. When we got there knocked on the door: (Apologies for paraphrasing, it was a long time ago) "Yes...", said the man. "We phoned earlier about the Fiat," I enthused. "Follow me..." He opened the garage and it was stuffed full of junk. "Where's the Fiat?" I asked nervously. "See those bin bags in the corner?"

That memory has stuck with me ever since. Whenever the Mirafiori is mentioned bin liners spring to mind.

The other car should've been consigned to the (sin) bin, and it pains me to say, as I'm a huge Triumph fan - TR7. I never gravitated to it then or now. To me that isn't a Triumph, more of a designers nightmare, and like the Mira, hasn't aged well.

plastic penguin
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Joined: 2011-06-14

Dinsdale Piranha wrote:

In my opinion, MGBs, I realise that 99% of people will disagree but then that's the great thing about opinions.

Strangely I would love a Mirafiori, many happy memories of one owned by a friend just after we started driving. He wasn't the most mechanically minded of chaps, he confused a few of us by complaining how long it took to top up the oil.  After a demonstration we pointed out that pouring it down the dipstick hole was probably not the most efficient method.

Quick story: About 20-odd years ago a friend and I were looking around for replacement cars and I saw this SuperMirafiori for sale in Sydenham, SE London. It was about 18 miles round trip and thought it was worth a look. When we got there knocked on the door: (Apologies for paraphrasing, it was a long time ago) "Yes...", said the man. "We phoned earlier about the Fiat," I enthused. "Follow me..." He opened the garage and it was stuffed full of junk. "Where's the Fiat?" I asked nervously. "See those bin bags in the corner?"

That memory has stuck with me ever since. Whenever the Mirafiori is mentioned bin liners spring to mind.

The other car should've been consigned to the (sin) bin, and it pains me to say, as I'm a huge Triumph fan - TR7. I never gravitated to it then or now. To me that isn't a Triumph, more of a designers nightmare, and like the Mira, hasn't aged well.