Coachbuilding disasters and triumphs (if there are any)

5 replies [Last post]
Graeme Hurst
Graeme Hurst's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-04-19

How is this for something, er... unique? Not seen one before? I'ts the Dennis Adams-designed Glenfrome Range Rover... one of eight built for the Saudi royal family. Talk about beauty being in the eye of the beholder but don't forget this thing was screwed together at the end of the decade of excess so it probably tied in quite nicely with bespoilered Countachs and red 911 Turbos. (along with brick-sized mobile phones!)

 

Nuno Granja
Nuno Granja's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-09-12

Graeme,

If you look at some buildings in SA they match perfectly with the car. Too much gold, and too  much useless details with a total lack of connection between them.

nuno granja

Chris Martin
Offline
Joined: 2011-08-20

Well it is only a Dennis Adams! What would you expect?

A few more of his in the disasters file, and a few Gordon Buehrig designs in the triumphs should get the ball rolling. Then of course we will have the Gandinis, Michelottis and etceterinis on the plus side, and the Leyland P76 as an example of how to make a car like it was built with Lego bricks

Anyway, I suspect this post may generate a bit of argument later on so may I be the first to suggest Lady Docker as being responsible for a few cars that qualify for both Disasters and Triumphs at the same time. Love the Hooper Empress line, not so keen on animal skin seat covers, she could do both.

Chris M.

 

Nuno Granja
Nuno Granja's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-09-12

Therr is another problem when  "touching" very well designed cars as the Range Rover...

 

nuno granja

GBt
GBt's picture
Offline
Joined: 2011-05-31

The Costin Wooden Wonder, the first car Jackie Stewart raced And another from the Adams family.

OK this is only a model of The Panthermobile then there is the Panther Westwinds Solo.

Chris Martin
Offline
Joined: 2011-08-20

Yes, and Costin was the master of trying to make garden sheds aerodynamic, while the Adams school of Origami thankfully never really caught on.

If I may propose most, but certainly not all, Figoni and Falaschi designs from the mid to late thirties as great triumphs, and the BL Princess as a useful doorstop.

Chris M.