Comments about the latest C&SC

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Mario Laguna
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Joined: 2011-08-29

Australia - 1 ; Luxembourg - 0, this month.
Two hypotheses: a) fog in the Channel, the Continent isolated; or b) still using elephant back for transportation.
A few minutes ago In front of my newsagent (K - for Kiosk)

 

Mario Laguna
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Joined: 2011-08-29

So late this month, D+13, but like a work of art.
No paper sculptures by Heather Carroll

Mario Laguna
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Within 24 hours I read October's cover story and met the real thing in the flesh.
What a thrilling experience!

 

James Elliott
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Joined: 2011-03-11

Mario Laguna wrote:

Within 24 hours I read October's cover story and met the real thing in the flesh.
What a thrilling experience!

 

Mario,

That is why your issue was late, we deliberately delayed it so that its arrival would coincide with you seeing the D-type. Ahem.

n/a
Mario Laguna
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Wonderful, J, you (and C&SC staff) deserve this.
They don't care much about panel fitting, do they? (I mean the Jag's panel fitting)
M,

 

Swordfish
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There was a brief bit of footage of the featured DType in last evening's ITV program on the 2013 Goodwood Revival.

That being during a tribute to the late and some say greatest(myself included)Jim Clark, it made clear the diversity of types of racing cars he raced too.

Mario Laguna
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Joined: 2011-08-29

During a recent 10-days trip from N-Y to Miami on back roads, I have been looking for the November issue, but couldn't find it.
I found, however the October issue in good company at Books-A-Million, an excellent bookstore in Aiken, South Carolina, which deserves a mention in my road book (see bellow).
First thing back home was purchasing the November issue.
I liked (so far) the MW's Yokohama story, excellent the Dino pic.

 

Mario Laguna
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Joined: 2011-08-29

December issue, available in Luxembourg on D+12 (D for the day available in GB).
2013 has been a year rich on 911 celebrations, therefore a Special C&SC collector's edition is very appropriate and will be treasured by all Porsche fans.
Nice Tangerine colour too for the RS cover car (similar to my 1971 engine lid)

Mario Laguna
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Joined: 2011-08-29

Reading December issue, already on page 6.
Alastair, crossing Lower Manhattan, NY, in the rush hour in a 911 wasn't that hard.

That's it

Chris Martin
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Joined: 2011-08-20

Wow, got January today!  Thanks, it looks like a good 'un so far.  As it has long been a personal favourite the first thing I looked for was Buckley's report on the Avanti; great car, great photos, just a shame you don't have more space for in-depth analysis.  He trots out the old Raymond Loewy designed the Coca-Cola bottle fairy-tale.  It was in fact designed in 1915 by one Earl R. Dean at a time when Loewy was still in France.  As he did do some work for them later in the thirties, and the bottle had become a design icon, Loewy, always a master at self-promotion claimed the credit for designing it anyway, and as Martin's repetition of the old chestnut again proves, if you shout loud enough, one day it will become fact.

The story of how the Avanti design came about is also worth the space to tell in it's entirety. At a time when Studebaker was suffering in the sales race, boss Sherwood Egbert came up with the idea and sketched out a rough shape and than tasked Loewy with the job of having a finished design within six weeks.  This he acheived by renting a house in the desert near Palm Springs California, thinking there would be no distractions from the job at hand, then he took three hand-picked specialists with him; Tom Kellog for sketching, clay modeller Robert Andrews and project director John Epstein.  What they came up with was one of the great shapes of American motoring history, but alas, due to other problems not of the Avanti's making, Studebaker was about to have the life-support switched off.

So, coincidentally, another great design that never got far but deserved better was the Trident, the fate of which James Elliott laments in his Misfire column on page 33.  Like the Avanti, if it had gone into production with TVR, or any other of the many British sports car firms of the 60s if you could have found one one a sounder financial footing, it should have been one of the great classics of it's time.  Although the Avanti is numerically far more common, both deserve recognition.

And here is the conicidence, in James' report he states that Trevor Fiore first came up with the original concept when, aged 20, he was working for......................................................................................................................Loewy Design Studios.

Chris M.