since when do you read c&sc

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GBt
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Joined: 2011-05-31

Mario I think it was born out of a magazine called Classic and Thoroughbred and also

 

 

 

DUESIE
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Joined: 2011-07-06

GBt wrote:

Mario I think it was born out of a magazine called Classic and Thoroughbred and also

 

 

 

That other one is still going. Dare I mention it on here? Now called Thoroughbred (in small print) & Classic Cars, but I hasten to add for fear of a lifetime ban, it is not as good as C&SC.

Chris Martin
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Joined: 2011-08-20

Mario Laguna wrote:

Thank you Chris, I shall look for that particular '96 issue and read Conway's comments.
I also whish the air cargo with your 30th Anniversary copy lands shortly in Australia.
M,

I have a spare if you want it.

Just something I do here, swapmeets and the like buying and selling old books, mag's car stuff etc, and old C&SCs are always wanted, but I have a November '96, as well as an October '96, the last of the Sportscar ones if you want. Check the photos for the different banner at the top.

I have to say there is not much in the editorial that explains the change, but if you want them for the postage cost let me know and I will get a quote for airmail.

Chris M.

By the way Mario, I have never been able to find a copy of your Pegaso book. Let me know if you know of any copies left for sale.

 

Mario Laguna
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Joined: 2011-08-29

Hi Chris. Thank you very much for the nice photos, you really know C&SC's history.
I reckon by the cover pages I got those issues in some box in the cellar. Your photos show another change operated at the same time: the more modern wings. I suppose the wings were either Jaguar, Lagonda or Bentley inspirations.
For the Pegaso book, thank you very much for asking.
Although I don't want to use this forum for publicity, I guess other readers wouldn't mind me giving a short description.
A Pegaso sportscar (or sports car) is yet to hit Australian soil, but you probably have already seen a Pegaso lorry or bus.
Made in Spain from 1951-1956, only 84 Z-102 Pegasos left the ENASA factories in Barcelona and Madrid.
My book covers 57 specimens which represent every model and specification, described by chassis number and coachbuilder (ENASA, Saoutchik, Touring and Serra).
The hand signed and numbered first edition of 999 copies is available only in Spanish, but with hundred of period photos and technical data.
La aventura Pegaso is the only brand new book on the advanced car available in the world (other two Pegaso books were edited years ago, also in Spanish, but are only available second hand).
Please send a message to Clive Stroud or son Paul at Chaters, where copies of the book are available.

Chris Martin
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Joined: 2011-08-20

Thanks Mario.

Let me know if you are missing either magazine.

As for the Pegaso, yes I was aware of some of the history, and as I make a hobby of collecting car books, and the rarer the the subject the better, so I would prefer to read about Pegaso rather than for example another book on Ferrari.

And by the way, Spanish (or French) is no problem.

I already have the Automobile Quarterly volume 49-3 with your Pegaso feature, (as well as another by Winston Goodfellow in AQ 39-3).

Regards

Chris M.

 

Mario Laguna
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Joined: 2011-08-29

Chris, was nice of you to mention.
Goodfellow's monographic piece on the one-off Thrill by Touring Superleggera, #0102.150.0133, is wonderful indeed.
If you want to know more on engineer Wifredo Ricart, the Pegaso mastermind, see Griffith Borgeson - AQ Vol. 25, No. 3 (1987).
But the first Pegaso story featured at AQ you can find in Vol. 6, No. 2 (1967). M, 

Chris Martin
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Joined: 2011-08-20

Mario Laguna wrote:

Chris, was nice of you to mention.
Goodfellow's monographic piece on the one-off Thrill by Touring Superleggera, #0102.150.0133, is wonderful indeed.
If you want to know more on engineer Wifredo Ricart, the Pegaso mastermind, see Griffith Borgeson - AQ Vol. 25, No. 3 (1987).
But the first Pegaso story featured at AQ you can find in Vol. 6, No. 2 (1967). M, 

Mario. Yes, I have the full set of AQ as well as C&SC and many others. In fact the library has grown so that I am starting on building an extension on the back of the house, but it is not just collecting for the sake of it, I am trying to arrange it so I have a useful research library with everything indexed, cross-referenced and available instantly. Meanwhile, if there is anything you need copied, for research that Google's content is not enough, let me know, I may have it.

Chris M.

 

mrtotty
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Joined: 2011-06-03

About 1982, I think, as a fifteen-year-old, to answer the thread question. It was bought from the Meridian House bookshop in Papakura, New Zealand (the bookshop is now long gone).

That must have been one of the first issues.

Casper Friedrich
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Joined: 2012-04-23

I bought my first copy March 1986 in Denmark, when cruising to Lübeck with my mother. The magazine had a slightly larger format than today.

To prove it I want to quote the beginning of Doug Nye's feature Bella Berlinetta about the Lamborghini Countach of the thirties in that very issue:

You can forget your Bugatti Royales and Rolls-Royce Silver Ghosts. Erase memories of "Blower" Bentleys and Hispanos, Delahayes, Delages and special-bodied Talbots.

 

martin thaddeus
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Joined: 2012-05-23

Hello

 

I have been buying and reading the mag since 82 but didnt realize that the thing was so new.  I clearly remember an edition which proudly announced the £3000 Porsche on the cover.  I was working as graphic artist for my local paper and also doing a shift at a rather good burger shop in Crawley.

I did stop buying C&S in the mid 90's when my son pointed out that I was looking at cars which I could never own,  But these days I get it every month along with Practical Classics which appeals to my prolertarian roots.

THADDEUS