ERAs go head-to-head as rare Astons invade Prescott

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Mac Hulbert’s ERA R4D claimed Fastest Time of the Day at the Vintage Sports-Car Club’s Prescott Speed Hill Climb on 3-4 August.

ERAs go head-to-head as rare Astons invade Prescott
Mac Hulbert’s ERA R4D claimed Fastest Time of the Day at the Vintage Sports-Car Club’s Prescott Speed Hill Climb on 3-4 August.
Hulbertduelled for the spoils with James Baxter and his recently acquired ERA R4A, but called on his experience to cross the finish line just 0.36 secs faster.  
Terry Crabb’s time of 45.89 secs in a ERA R12C gave him victory in Class 14, while Charlie Martin’s ‘RIP’ Special posted a blistering 46.28-secs run to be the fastest vintage car in the class.
Classic Aston Martins were also out in force with a unique gathering of very early machines parading up the hill during Sunday’s lunch break.
Star of the show was the 1921 A3, which is the only surviving prototype of five built and the oldest Aston Martin in existence (see C&SC April for a full road test). 
It starred alongside Green Pea, one of two 1.5-litre racing cars funded by Count Louis Zborowski, and Razor Blade. The latter was built in 1923 and aimed to become the first 1.5-litre car to lap Brooklands at over 100mph – something it failed to do. 
The ‘original’ Astons were also joined by a number of later cars from the Bertelli era plus specials such as the Buzzbox, which was built in 1926 and is the only car to be fitted with a 1.5-litre Renwick and Bertelli engine.

Hulbert duelled for the spoils with James Baxter in his recently acquired ERA R4A, but called on his experience to cross the finish line just 0.36 secs faster.  

Terry Crabb’s time of 45.89 secs in ERA R12C gave him victory in Class 14, while Charlie Martin’s ‘RIP’ Special posted a blistering 46.28-secs run to be the fastest vintage car in the class.

Classic Aston Martins were also out in force with a unique gathering of early machines parading up the hill during Sunday’s lunch break.

Star of the show was the 1921 A3 (above), which is the only surviving prototype of five built and the oldest Aston Martin in existence (see C&SC April for a full road test). 

It starred alongside Green Pea (above), one of two 1.5-litre racing cars funded by Count Louis Zborowski, and Razor Blade (below). The latter was built in 1923 and aimed to become the first 1.5-litre car to lap Brooklands at over 100mph – something it failed to do. 

The ‘original’ Astons were also joined by a number of later cars from the Bertelli era plus specials such as the Buzzbox, which was built in 1926 and is the only car to be fitted with a 1.5-litre Renwick and Bertelli engine.

Pics: Eric Sawyer (Aston Martins) and Phil Jones

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